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on the fiscal cliff. this morning "washington journal" talk to a business representative about his take on the negotiations. host: let's begin with what is business forward, how did it come about? guest: is simple mission. our job is to make it easier for business leaders in the country who care about policy issues but did not have a washington office or a lobbyist, to speak about the issues of public policy. host: is this a brand-new organization? who is involved? >> we have been around 3 1/2 years, supported by some of the biggest companies of the world, with business leaders are in the country. we go out to small business owners, entrepreneurs, venture capitalist to get them involved in policy-making. what we do is we bring administration officials, members of congress, governors out to cities around the country to be briefings with business leaders. what we also do is bring the business leaders to washington. we tell them how to grow jobs and accelerate. host: what did the business leaders say to the president and how did it come about? guest: we have been doing this for a year, bri
will talk about the economic needs of middle class families and ways to avoid -- to avoid the fiscal cliff here on c-span. until then, more about the budget cuts and how they could affect the nation's defense budget and national security from this morning's "washington journal." host: we are continuing our series, looking at different parts of the fiscal cliff talks. today we want to focus on sequestration. joining us now is robert levenson, a senior defense analyst at bloomberg government. let's begin with what secret -- with what sequestration means. term. if you have looked it up on google 20 months ago, it would have something to do with coal and carbon, but this is about automatic cuts going into place known as sequestration. host: how did this come about? where is it headed? caller: as we recall from last year, there was a crisis over raising the debt ceiling. republicans demanded some cuts from congress. they agreed to $1 trillion in cuts, they handed over $1.50 trillion to the super committee. because they failed to come up with a deal that could be approved by congress and the pre
different direction from the fiscal cliff and talk more about long-term and medium-term economic realities we face. in your written testimony to this committee, you warned against kicking the can down the road in definitely because of the adverse effect that might have on the economy. the medium and long-term impact it might have. i thought your analysis was definitely something we need to pay attention to. as you observed in the failure to make progress in this area now could signal that we have bigger troubles ahead. thatoody's analytics model you used breaks down about 2028. the reason it does that because at that point, the interest on our national debt will start to cripple our economy. we will be left without much recourse. i'm not sure there is a tax increase on the planet that could suddenly fix that. i'm not sure we could print money fast enough. if we did, we would go the way of argentina. i tend to think of this medium and long term risk as the fiscal avalanche. the cliff is something we are approaching now and we can see where is this. we know will hit the cliff. the avalanche
concerns with the fiscal cliff talks? guest: so for most small business owners and senior executives at big, big companies, the fear is that going over the cliff, even on a technical term is going to cause more uncertainty, increase their borrowing cost, and it's going to put our economic recovery at risk. and most point to simpson bowles and understand that we have to raise revenue and we also have to control spending, they generally like the outlines of simpson bowles deal they like the principles behind it, those are pretty clear, pred spread the cost, protect the most vulnerable, don't disrupt the economic recovery, try to simplify the tax code while you're at it. they generally support those principles. >> do you think a recession could happen if we go off this fiscal cliff? guest: they do. i think there's a qualitative difference this year and last. we saw business leaders were concerned that washington wasn't going to come together with a deal and it could end badly. but it was a more muted concern. i think they trusted that washington would get it done. an given how closely -- close
're really talking about as part of the fiscal cliff. >> that is what might be cut. that is what automatically expires. we know it cost $30 billion to continue additional unemployment benefits. of the deal i want to make, the benefits should continue. firm stand. we have seen in the past obama host: what specific benefits do guest: usually some kind of a cash benefit or they may help the search for a job. it is usually about $300 a week. it can vary from state sen. in the mississippi i want to say it is closer to $200. host: how are the programs funded? payroll taxes. through the trust the state administers the program and the money goes to the unemployed. host: talk about qualifications order to apply? guest: generally what you have to do is you have to have a year certain threshold. you have to have been let go from a job. and necessarily qualify for -- to qualify for unemployment benefits. if he graduated from college and do not have a job, you getit is a pretty easy system to get into if you were laid off after 10 years. host: we have some qualifications a person must meet on
. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. >> thank you, mr. speaker. we're in this fiscal cliff talks and the president and the speaker are trying to work out a solution. and they're talking about tax raters in top 2%. mr. cohen: taxing their wealth. that's something they should do because it's fair and it gives the over 98% tax relief. but at the same time they're talking about increasing the medicare age from 65 to 67. and that's taxing the wealth of the less fortunate people who are 65 to 67. for them and for everybody, your health is your wealth. jimmy copeland a friend and semiphilosopher said that, your health is your wealth. if you raise the medicare age from 65 to 67, you're going to sacrifice the health of people who are not the most fortunate system of while we tax the income of the most wealthy, we'll be taxes what wealth theless wealthy have, their health. that's wrong. mr. president and mr. speaker should not increase that age and tax the poor. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the -- does the gentlelady from texas seek recogniti
and how congressional leaders plan to handle social security as part of the fiscal cliff talks. first up here on overview from a capitol hill reporter on social security. >> here to talk about the prop program and how it is involved in these discussions. steven joining us from the associated press where he's a reporter. thank you for being here. how many people in america receive social security and how much do they get? guest: a little bit more than 56 million people get social security and the average benefit is a little over $12,000 -- let's see, a little over $1,200 a month. so maybe it's like $13,000, $14,000 a year. host: and we're talking about retirees. also, though, the disabled. guest: yes, yes. actually we have a fairly wide group of people get social security benefits. retired workers, spouses, children, disabled workers, widows, widowers. it's actually a fairly big social safety net of people who get social security benefits. host: as you mentioned, about 56 million beneficiaries. those retirees receive about $1,200 a month on average. the benefits for the disabled, $1,100 a
to this extraordinary country that we inherited. that being said, before we talk about fiscal cliff, we are here because of the last fiscal cliff. since we had another fiscal cliff-type scenario that created the scenario and ridiculous idea that i voted against, put a bunch of things bad to happen at one time. surprise, it didn't work and we are facing this. there are two issues number one, avoid doing damage and avoid doing harm. and we need to look for a way to accomplish that in the short-term. and we have to, we have to have a conversation about getting the fiscal house in order. i heard bob talking about that. it is true. we spend $1 trillion more than we take in. it's a fact and we have to address it. i approach this issue with the following belief. the only way to get it in order is through rapid economic growth. no taxes you can raise to bring the debt down. what the president is offering is not enough but will make a dent on job creation, particularly middle-class job creation. i oppose his plan. we should do real tax reform. if there are loopholes, there is a loophole for being able to write o
the fiscal cliff and the needs of middle-class families. on c-span2, its "the communicator's" michael powell talking about the future of television. on c-span3, a discussion on the iranian nuclear program and the middle east. that's on the c-span networks. tomorrow morning, a program looking at the fiscal cliff and what could happen if the budget cuts set to go in effect take place in january. we will hear from jim doyle on how the fiscal cliff could affect businesses and charles park from the government executive media group. he will look at domestic program cuts. then more and your e-mail, phone calls and tweets. that's on "washington journal" tomorrow morning starting at 7:00. on capitol hill, a house is back in tomorrow. members will consider whether to send negotiators to meet with the senate on defense department programs for next year. off the floor of negotiations continuing over the fiscal clef. that's a combination of tax increases and spending cuts set to begin in january. live coverage of the house tomorrow at 2:00 eastern on c- span. earlier today, the pew center on the states h
the fiscal cliff is upon us, and one thing that i know is clear in talking to my constituents, time and time guenther' looking for solutions to the problems that we face. -- again, they're looking for solutions to the problems that we face. the solutions will come from us working together, forging a bipartisan solution to the problems that we face and i hope we can go bigger than what is simply asked of us. mr. speaker, one of the great pleasures of being here is to be able to work with good friends. and i want to thank my good friend, steve latourette, and jim cooper as well, for putting together the cooper-latourette bill that is based on simples-bowles, helps raise revenues and -- simpson-bowles, helps raise revenues. today i'm asking my colleagues to join me in putting a bipartisan solution on the table. i want to thank my good friend, steve latourette, and jim cooper. with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentlelady from texas rise? ms. jackson lee: to address the house for one minute. the speaker pr
're talking about fiscal cliff and tax issues. caller: thanks for taking my call. and i just think that the government is so corrupt and all in different departments, there's so much fraud going on, like the medicare program, the doctors and the insurance companies have brought the department so bad. they need some cleanup crew, cleanup people to check all the fraud that's going on. i watched american greed on tv and some people ought to watch. that i just watched it the other night, about the skin doctor that was cutting elderly people, special people that's on medicare, and he was -- so many doctors, when that first was passed when president johnson signed the bill into law, it was miss managed once the doctors didn't want it at first. they voted against it and the republican senators, i remember clearly. i -- i'm 85 years old. and i've paid taxes since i've been 15 years old. i've paid into the -- host: social security, medicare. caller: social security, i've paid into that all through my life. host: we appreciate you're watching, we appreciate you're calling. in any comment fir
to get the economy back on track. she was talking about about solutions to avert the fiscal cliff. if if you look at how we got here, nothing gets resolved out of washington, it's an abyss that doesn't need to happen. if you just go back and look at the promises made by poth because massachusetts when he was running for office, when he was running for re-election, he talked about working across the aisle he talked about bipartisan solutions he talked about it a lot and the american people expected that the president would keep that promise. but before the ink was even dry, before some of the states had confirmed and finalized their vote totals for this last election, the president comes out with a hyper partisan solution that's his approach. when the president comes out with his plan to raise taxes on some, not renew ores, to threaten middle class families with a tax increase if some people don't get their taxes raised, there already was a bipartisan solution to avert this cliff. just a few months ago, here in this house, we passed a bill with 19 democrat votes. a strong bipartisa
leadership on the democratic side. we are talking about the so-called fiscal cliff. of course our cameras have been covering all of the events here in washington as both sides try to negotiate their argument with the public. if you go to our website, c-span.org, we have a special website setaside, webpage, c-span.org/fiscalcliff. or tweet us your thoughts using the #fiscal cliff. go ahead, payton. caller: thank you. i'm one of the original owners and i live in one of the poorest areas of the country which is one of the most highly republican areas of the country. i always intended if the republicans -- host: we are losing you, there. caller: somebody else is speaking. what i want to tell you is this cost of living is shameful way to protect the rich. host: we'll leave it there, payton. guest: he's got -- i can't add much to that. you're right. the previous caller who had talked making $14,000, he and his wife, their total income was $14,000 year on sfments he's not throwing -- on social security. he's not throwing money around. you start limiting the cost of living, the increases to keep
spending in washington and finally address the problem. >> as we continue to try to solve the fiscal cliff, the thing week of always continued to look at is our economy. wanting it to continue to grow. today in the whip's office we'll have small family-owned businesses in there talking about ways that we can protect the family business, continue to grow, while at the same time make sure we solve this fiscal cliff. look, each and every day, as we walk the halls, you continue to ask questions. you want the answers solving the fiscal cliff. we put an answer on the table. the president now has to engage. i think the next 72 hours are critical. if he sits back and continues to play politics, that will give you an answer of where we're going. this is an opportunity for this country to lead. this is an opportunity for the president to lead. >> at these fiscal cliff negotiations and debate continues, i think it's important to remember that washington doesn't have a revenue problem. it has a spending problem. and under this administration, under president obama, we have seen record deficits and a r
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14